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, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
politics and the american civil rights movement. in south africisa the majority the population is black and hert white. he wanted to know how did a minority end up achieving civilh rights. he's fasecinated with the founding fathers. it's something mandela also does. but also, citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states.uth remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. so we were inspiring to nelson t mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything that really surprised you? i'm sure you prepare add head of time and researched him and gota to know the man through what you were able to read and hear through other personal ane anecdotes. >> i said you are a beacon to the world in terms of the sacrifice and 27 years in jail. standing up for principal: he started laughing. i was taken aback. i thought he's not understanding this american guy, you know? but he said no.wa it's when he was growing up all he wanted to do was rebel against his parents. hewa wanted to get out of the b tribal situation. he was like a prince and go to the big city of johannesburg.
, because the first weekend in july 50 years ago was when the civil rights act of 1964 was signed. >> wow. >> and so we will be back the first week in july 50 years later, and we will recommit ourselves to that purpose of that civil rights opportunity act. so we're excited. >> now, we got it's the 20th anniversary. it's going to be around voting 50 years after the civil rights act. but one thing that is always off the chain is the entertainment. but i said that there's no way you could beat last year because you had beyonce. but you did. we're announcing tonight you have prince next year. >> prince will headline our essence festival for 2014. he was our headliner ten years ago for the tenth anniversary, and he is back. we are honored, excited, and even more emboldened than ever that this will be the biggest party and will position us to achieve our purpose in 2014. >> as you look back as someone that wasn't around when essence was founded and you see where we are today in the midst of this is the middle of the second term of the first african-american president, you're hosting such a huge
of the people. and somehow the movement here, the civil rights movement in our country deserves much credit for the change we now see in america, and in south africa. >> well, and reverend, to that point, that's why it is so interesting -- i think, and potentially enlightening, to see some of the political debate playing out more among republicans. but take a listen to more from former speaker newt gingrich, in doing what rick hertzburg was doing, embracing as a founding father in politics, one of the best things you could say about someone. take a listen. >> posted my statement on her facebook page and was amazed at some of the intensity, some of whom came back three and four and five times, repeating how angry they were. so i wrote my newsletter on friday, basically entitled it, "what would you have done." >> and he goes on to talk about what the legacy of mandela is being a revolutionary and freedom fighter and also a patriot. how do you looking at this now, national/international conversation, how do you think we're doing in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign
. this is a major civil rights case and nationally known after hurricane katrina. they thought they had closure. now they know that they don't. >> that has to be true of the glover team. we've just seen those pictures. bell he continue to see that. thank you. >> the obama administration said it has met it's deadline to fix the healthcare.gov website. the administration promised all would be well in november. we will gather to the white house with more details, mike, this was a big deadline for the administration. are all the problems with the website solved? >> reporter: they aren't all solved but they say its like night and day after that disastrous launch of octobe october 1st. they cite certain benchmarks, certain metrics, error rates down to 1%. they were 6% at the outset of this debacle in the estimation of administration officials. as many as 800,000 a day and they achieved 90% functionality. you recall that by the end of last month, november 31st they had promised an 80% functionality. by their own estimation they have exceeded that. but that's by their own estimation. for the time being we'
to the pending federal civil rights lawsuit hi filed against the department, the department had also been conducting its own investigation. it says it uses data not profiling to fight crime. >> if you have a black chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager, that does not make sense in a prodetermine innocently african-american city. >> i know the department didn't do inning wrong. >> he initially agreed to participate in the program. because of the crime in the area, it is an aggressive approach, which focuses on targeting small crimes like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. six years ago it was the 13th most violent city, last year it drops. >> police must take any concerns about racial profiling very seriously. or lose trust. >> by abusing the rights you ail len nate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> disenchanted he has now dropped out of the zero tolerance program, as for sampson, he says he now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> al jazeera, miami gardens. >> the record setting streak on wall street is quickly fading
st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights, and prison reform as its foundation. no one's life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of an out-of-control war on drugs. mandatory minimum sentences that force judges to give 10, 20, sometimes 50 year sentences for drug offenses are crazy and they've got to end. it is a human tragedy. it is an idea of justice. and there need to be new voices from either party that will say it's time to change. this is whay i've joined with democrats on this. [applause] i've joined with democrats on this. i'm working with senator leahy from vermont to try to give junls more freedom, more leeway when it comes to sentencing. if it were your kid would you want to know whether it was their first crime? whether there's a chance to rehabilitate
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
they send their kids to school. a pastor says school choice is a civil rights issue. he might be right. we are part of the country that tries school choice as benefits, especially minorities. too much the government says here is a school in your district, it is failing, tough luck. people in detroit have had enough of this. 80% percent of the parents in detroit would have enough choice would take another choice. families want the freedom to choose to send their kids were they would like to send them. i want them to have as many choices as possible. i live where public schools are good. my kids are sent to the public high school in kentucky. in my county, my kids can choose from five different schools. they have to compete with each other. i cannot understand how anyone could be against competition, empowering parents with choice. the freedom to innovate is important. charter schools get rid of this top-down approach, one-size-fits-all. study showed charter kids learn more material than their counterparts. opponents of school choice complained and say that is government money. you sent gove
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
the people of his own homeland and those that worked for freedom and civil rights across the world. many offer tribe utes that somehow seem to full short of describing nelson mandela, so we began with the great man's own words, the ones we will all remember of him. "dif", he once wrote to his wife, "break some men, but make others. real leaders must be willing to sacrifices all for the freedom of their people. i can rest only for a moment for with freedom come responsibilities, and i dare not linger for my long walk is not yet ended." >> but that long walk came to an end. tribeauts been pouring in. those who knew him or who are inspired by his struggle: >> our correspondent had a story from new orleans, a restaurant that offered an unforgettable meal. >> this is a flag. >> of all the meals prepared the a simple dish. >> i'm speechless thinking about it. >> markets were mauritious worked in the cape town hotel. >> i was there at the right time. i had the privilege to cook mr nelson mandela's first meal out of imprisonment. they were there to discuss negotiations for his relief. >> 3 o'clo
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
. because stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. getting women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been easy for us to change how we do business. in this country. this has been the case for social security, medicare, for all the great social progress we have made in the country. >> however, greg are the young people buying it? because today, the harvard institute of politics released a poll saying that the young people, not always the most reliable voters, and confused in their views, it seems. the majority of them said today they disapproved of obama care and if given the chance, they would recall president obama. not vote for him today. >> i think the valuable lesson they have learned is cool doesn't reflect achievement, it masks incompetence. my niece had posters of justin bieber all over her room and suddenly they were gone. >> because your took them. >> i did. they're in my camper under the underpass. they could have listened to me. i'm like the camp counselor saying, don't p
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all now.e same boat what's going on in this town is that too often, the two parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the nemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have he sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common a common nd for sure destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. your don't work with party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll finish by recounting words that lyndon johnson, a master legislator, said once. e grew up poor in the hill country
a message to state legislatures. >> i think it's a big help. the civil rights act didn't end racism. i don't think this is going to end homophobia or transphobia. >> reporter: zachary kiesch, news 4. >>> right now at 6:00, d.c. mayor vincent gray talks up his administration after announcing he will seek re-election but gets testy with reporters who challenge him on skal dal allegations. >> i'm done. i'm done, okay, i'm done. >>> plus, a d.c. cop facing charges of child pornography for pictures he took on the job. why there could be more victims. >>> president obama taking on critics of the affordable care act. >> the bottom line is, this law is working and will work into the future. >>> good evening, everybody. i'm jim handly in for jim vance. >> i'm doreen gentzler. we begin with the fast moving race for d.c. mayor a day after vincent gray filed for re-election. reporters peppered him with questions about a federal probe of his 2010 campaign for mayor. tom sherwood reports all gray wanted to talk about was what's ahead. tom? >> the mayor is proud of the city's economic development, but he
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
in the southerners that fled after the passage of the civil rights act and precipitated the migration of the center of gravity in the republican party to the south. and you see this, you know, not just in the evolution of the elected officials in the party but also in polling of the attitudes of republicans, you know, republican voters. it's not an accident that the republican party said rosa parks has ended racism. because in polls you constantly see the majorities of republican voters and conservative voters believe that the real discrimination in this country is against white people and that kind of all structural racism had been eradicated. this wasn't a slip of the tongue as much as it was the accidentally revealing a basic tenant of conservative thought. >> i politely disagree with michelle. i don't know what poll that is. i would love to get the site of the polls that are saying that a vast majority of republicans view that there's reverse discrimination. and there's more white persons being discriminated against in this country and that's the real racism. certainly that was not the party th
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
, they weren't violating people's civil rights or privacy and it was a program carefully monitored and it is unfortunate the only person we have now to defend it is the president but nobody trusts him. he didn't know about the irs. >> do you believe that? >> i find it hard to believe. >> which is worse that he didn't know or he did know and he lied? >> i think the latter. i think -- i don't know how many times s you can say i didn't know about that. the president of the united states, on issues that big, on benghazi for example and the irs scandal, i think those are things that if he doesn't know about he has an incompetent staff or given instructions he doesn't want to know. but the idea he didn't know about what was going on strikes me as just not credible. >> all right. i'll have more of our special chat with former vice president dick cheney tonight at 8:00 p.m. you might be surprise who is impressing him in the early presidential sweepstakes. it is not necessarily a certain governor in the state of new jersey. who is and who isn't, his struggle right now, his daughters are fig
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
that are starting to say, you know what, we're going to have to treat this almost like the civil rights movement. we're going to have to break this down into pieces and just keep moving the ball forward, but we cannot keep the status quo that we have right now. that doesn't work for anybody. >> the political equation is so interesting, i think, in this case because as you pointed out, margie, when you look at the polls and the demographics of the voting public, it just makes sense. now we're seeing chris christie, who of course is being named as a possible nominee in 2016, being accused of flip-flopping on in-state tuition for young, undocumented immigrants because his critics say he wants to run for president. he says he continues to support the idea, although he won't sign the specific bill that was passed by his state legislature. here's what he said yesterday about that flip-flopping charge. >> i am for tuition equality. as i said that night at the latino leadership, i am for tuition quality. i am not for adding tuition aid grants or adding undocumented out of state students to have rights that
believes that shooting was unjustified and they filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against both the deputy and the department. the santa rosa police department is investigating that shooting. the county board of supervisors meeting begins at 8:30 this morning and along with beginning to assign people to this community and law enforcement task force, the board of supervisors also are expected to decide on whether to explore the establishment of a memorial park there at the site where andy lopez was shot and killed. we're live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge news tuesday channel 2 news. >>> time now 6:45. a car salesman in hayward still stunned after a man posing as a potential buyer stole a luxury suv and drove off the lot. the man and another friend walked into the lot of empire auto sunday afternoon, said they were interested in the 2004 range rover, wanted to take it for a test drive. the salesman said he asked for a driver's license first and when one of the men walked away to get it the other man shoved him, jumped into the suv, and sped off. >> i was shocked, you k
of the most influential leaders and revolutionaries. along with our own civil rights leader dr. martin luther king, junior. among others on the list, presidents theodore roosevelt and ronald reagan, winston churchill and margaret thatcher, pope john paul ii and israel's first prime minister david bengoria. adolph hitler and mao. "time" went on to name the last century's three greatest people. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> osgood: runner up for franklin d. roosevelt and muhammad gandhi who led india's campaign against british colonialism. >> it is complete independence that we want. >> ghandi inspired among many others, nelson mandela who praised him in an essay for "time." growth ghandi and i suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respected peoples against government, is that violated our freedoms. when it came to choosing the greatest figure of the 20th century, "time" looked beyond politics to choose albert einstein, the scientist who derived the equation e equals mc squared. a choice defended by walter isaacson. >> he said politics is for the mome
? and the offensive rna mistweet with civil rights icon rosa parks declaring that she helped end racism. even though the rnc clarified the tweet, the firestorm continues. we'll speak with one of the people helping to lead the republicans' outreach to african-americans. face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. of their type 2 diabetes with non-insulin victoza®. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar, but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza®. he said victoza® is different than pills. victoza® is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once-a-day, any time, and comes in a pen. and the needle is thin. victoza® is not for weight loss, but it may help you lose some weight. victoza® is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 dia
in the civil rights movement the anti-apartheid movement was our opportunity to participate in that way. >> that's so true. we have to leave it there. congresswoman, safe travels. april, thank you for being with me. >> thank you. >>> when question come back, why is it acceptable for a 23-year-old offered $3 billion for an app but $3 billion seems like too much to keep a promise to workers who earned it? workers in an american city. that's coming up. turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1, proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. yes. cup your hands together for me. rub it all the way up your hands. any exposed skin. and get the backs of your hands too. put some just around your neck. [ bell rings ] you're good to go. okay great
a federal civil rights lawsuit against boat the deputy and the department. the santa rosa police department is investigating that shooting. this county board of supervisors meeting will begin an hour from now. along with appointing members to the community and law enforcement task force. supervisors here later on today are also expected to make a decision on whether to move forward to the creation of a memorial park that is planned or could be planned for the site, the field where andy lopez was shot and killed in october. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >> congress is moving to move a ban on guns that could evade metal detectors. it's due to expire next monday. mandemocrats wanted permanent metal components that would make plastic guns more detectable. the republican--led house is expected to have this changed. >>> the search continues for a missing couple that disappeared during a thanksgiving fishing trip. 64-year-old van chanpenxi and his wife, chantra. went wishing on the delta last thursday. their boat was found still running near the rio vista brid
think that it's a violation of the law. we have to balance our security with a respect for civil rights and our constitution, which has made america different. and what the nsa has done with the administration's concurrence simply does the security route and forgets about the civil liberties and constitutional laws. heather: you put together this freedom act that you see you say is different. how is that? >> it restricts who the nsa can collect information from, specifically the bull collection of records by the nsa. it's as simple as that. heather: you are also calling for civilians to be in charge. what difference do you think that will make? >> the military does a good job, but their job is to protect the security of the united states and forget about the constitutional concerns and i think that having someone without a military background as well as being a national director of intelligence, that would bring the proper balance in determining what to ask the court to approve and how to go about collecting this information. and i can say thoroughly that we do need to have a properly a
and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero did it with papyrus rolls and ore members -- other members of the roman elites were linked to him and al
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel that there is more power to the military which could mean less democracy. >> when the u.s. secretary of state john kerry was in cairo it was recognizing human rights more than democratic and what is the reaction to the way the constitution has now been shaped? >> we have already heard from americans regarding a new floor that was put in place and condemned it and said it had serious flaws and officials said the same thing and they call to the government to amendment. other provisions here that may find problematic. the u.s. is walking a delicate balance and doesn't want to interfere too much but also need to put enough pressure because many of the people expect them to do so when things are dipped to human rights violations and especially when it comes to the military getting more power. one thing we have to make clear is this referendum will be put to a vote and only if it's approved by the people the other steps and parliamentary elections an
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
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